Posts Tagged ‘Restoration’

Muscle Car Parts Mainstay The Paddock Facing Auction Block

Friday, May 28th, 2010

Warehouse and Showroom Items to be Auctioned at Company’s Knightstown, IN facility on July 29. Sealed Bids Being Accepted for Company’s Intellectual Property.

Avon, IN (PRWEB) May 22, 2010 — The down economy has claimed another victim—The Paddock, a mainstay in the muscle car parts business for over 40 years. Indianapolis-based Key Auctioneers (www.KeyAuctioneers.com) announced today that it will auction the company’s parts inventory, showroom items, collectibles, vehicles, and equipment at the company’s 60,000-square-foot Knightstown facility.

The Paddocks Knightstown headquarters.
The Paddocks Knightstown headquarters.

The July 29 auction is expected to draw thousands of muscle car enthusiasts from the Midwest and beyond.

The Paddock has been a leading supplier of muscle car parts for several decades. Its thirteen parts lines represent some of America’s most popular muscle cars, including Mustang, Corvette, GTO, and Camaro.

Company founder Jim O’Neil started The Paddock in 1965, restoring muscle cars in a small shop in Knightstown. By 1979, the company was manufacturing Mustang steel patch panels. The company’s first Mustang catalog was printed soon thereafter and the company started to grow by word of mouth. In 1980, the first Camaro catalog was printed. In 1998, Wes Watts, a former parts manager for the local Chevrolet dealership, purchased the company from O’Neil.

Over the years the company added Firebird, GTO, Chevelle, Nova, Cutlass, Impala and other catalogs to its muscle car line. In 2001, Watts built a state-of-the art 60,000-square-foot facility to accommodate his growing business.

According the Watts, the economic downturn of the last three years, along with the credit crisis, contributed to the company’s demise.

Key Auctioneers Senior Vice President Tim Boeglin said the company’s intellectual property was garnering a high degree of interest. Included in the intellectual property are the company’s name and trademarks, million-name customer list, websites, catalogs, and phone numbers.

About Key Auctioneers

Key Auctioneers is an Indianapolis-based auctioneer of commercial, industrial, and real estate assets in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, and Missouri. The company’s automotives division has auctioned several Indy racing teams, including MoNunn Racing, Panther Racing, and Guthrie Meyer Racing.

For more information about Key Auctioneers, contact Tim Boeglin or (812) 327-5352.

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1969 GTO Judge wrecks bigtime

Wednesday, February 17th, 2010

Oh no! Dude wrecks his beautifully restored 1969 GTO Judge into a pole.

Judge wrecks with 10 photos here

Studying these pics from the crash in St Paul, Minnesota, I made this Google Earth .KMZ file where I’ve marked my theoretical trajectory into the fat pole (will open if you have Google Earth application installed)

The wreck happened in August of 2009 and was featured on the main page of UltimateGTO.com for about 6 months, where thousands of GTO fans checked it out, many mourning the loss of a once great car, not to mention the unfortunate driver.

Classic Cars Pass Legislation to Scrap Old Senators

Tuesday, May 12th, 2009

Some humor from the Editor of The Endive

Olds Cutlass and Pontiac GTO

The Classic Car Senate passed legislation today that would reward Americans with up to $5,000 in tax incentives to scrap old, inefficient senators and representatives.

“We need new senators,” said Classic Car majority leader Pontiac GTO, “Old senators are polluting our air and using up our resources at an astounding rate. Let’s get some new, young senators inside the beltway who spout out less hot air and don’t consume as many cheeseburgers.”

The move was backed by an overwhelming majority of classic automobiles.

“It’s about time this legislation passed,” said Oldsmobile 442, “I’m excited about the influx of recycled material that will become available when these old senators are crushed and melted down. Now that’s what I call ‘going green.’”

The new legislation, HR-101.4, provides Americans who scrap older model senators with up $5,000 in tax rebates on the election of a new, smaller, more efficient senator.

“These old senators have ruled Washington so long that people don’t know what’s good for them anymore,” said Chevrolet Chevelle SuperSport, Classic Car senator from Michigan, “It’ll do my heart good to see these guys rounded up, cut to pieces and possibly shipped overseas to countries in need of their raw materials.”

Other American automobiles opposed the bill, unwilling to let go of their old lawmakers.

“I just like things the way he had them,” said Toyota Corolla of West Palm Beach, Florida, “My old Senator knows how to raise some taxes can stall a bill in congress for eight years. You can’t get that out of a new senator.”

Others questioned why a congress of classic muscle cars was pushing to scrap older people.

“I tried to ask Senator Plymouth Superbird why he was so interested in scrapping old senators,” said Toyota Prius, “But I couldn’t catch up to him. I’m not anywhere near as fast off the line and my top speed doesn’t even come close.”

Classic Car Senators did confirm speculation that the bill was crafted in response to Representative Henry Waxman and his scrappage legislation.

“Want to get us old clunkers off the road, huh Waxman?” said Buick GSX, “Before you can make us into tin cans, we’ll have you guys pureed into Soylent Green.”

“One more important message to our old senators,” added Representative Mercury Cyclone, “We are prettier, louder, and faster. Don’t mess with us.”

Shipping your GTO – how to do it right – guest article by Ben Leffler

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Comprehensive Automotive Shipping

auto shipping pic #1Whether you have purchased an everyday vehicle remotely or are sending it across the country for a competition, the condition upon arrival is always a concern. Nothing is worse than damage to your car that you didn’t even cause. It’s true that professional shippers are experienced and reliable most of the time, but accidents do happen and therefore anything you can do to minimize your risk is a good idea. The following will discuss important options to consider when choosing a transporter, as well as outline some simple steps to help reduce the chances of your vehicle being damaged while in transport.

When beginning the process of choosing a moving company for your vehicle, it is important to explore which kind of trailer is your best option. While tractor trailers that are capable of moving several vehicles at once are usually the cheapest option, it tends to take longer than single car transport. Also, due to the large size of these trucks you may have to meet your driver in a parking lot. Single car transporters can usually pick the vehicle up and drop it off in a residential area and may be able to get all the way to your front door. Your time frame and budget should be considered when weighing these two options.

auto shipping image #2Enclosed versus open trailer transport is another thing to consider. Once again, this should be discussed with your service provider to determine the best option for you. Closed trailers protect a vehicle from the elements at all times, but they can be twice as expensive as the open-air variety. For shorter distances in mild weather an open trailer may be best, but if you’re heading northeast during winter it may not, it just depends on the circumstances.

With so many shipping companies to choose from, finding one that services your area should not be a problem. However, before you hand over the keys you should make sure that the carrier is registered with the Department of Transportation. To do so, visit www.safersys.org and look up the company to make sure they are licensed to ship vehicles. From the same site you will also be able to check the company’s insurance information and compare it with the information that the company provides you when they quote you a price. Make sure that the policy is valid and that the coverage is sufficient before moving on. If you feel that the minimum policy provided to be lacking in any way, feel free to inquire about additional coverage.

Once you have determined that a shipping company is legal and insured, inquire about customer references. These provide proof of the shipper’s experience and competence, so they should be eager to share these with you. Also, be sure that at least some of the references are specific to vehicles similar to yours. You can also look up the company with Better Business Bureau for additional information on their history and records. Many companies are starting to offer free shipment tracking which allows you to go online and check the exact location of your vehicle at any time, so this is something you may want to inquire about.

Once you have chosen a carrier, it is time to prepare your vehicle to be transported. Keep in mind that different companies may require additional steps to be taken, especially if your vehicle is rare or extremely customized, but this should get you started.

Clean it out

auto shipping image #3The first step is to clean out the vehicle’s interior and the trunk. This not only ensures that your personal items will not be lost, but it also helps protect the auto’s inside. Loose stuff left in a vehicle on a trailer can bounce around and ding up seats and upholstery, as well as be damaged itself. Worst of all, a carrier’s insurance will not be liable. If there is something you prefer to keep in the vehicle, be sure that it is secured in a compartment or the glove box. At this point you should make sure that any aftermarket speakers are firmly held in place and stereo faceplates are removed.

Clean it off

Now that the inside is prepped, your vehicle’s exterior is the focus. Carefully wash and inspect for any existing damage. While this step applies less for a clunker than a new ride, it’s always better to know what shape the auto is in. Photograph all sides of the car and give a dated, written assessment. If you are dealing with insurance issues after damage, this step will make the process a lot easier.

auto shipping image #4Once the exterior has been cleaned and examined, all removable exterior parts that can possibly be broken while on the trailer should be secured or removed. Fold in the mirrors to the vehicle’s sides, lower the antenna and raise the windows. Convertible tops should be securely closed, and tool boxes shut and latched.

Check it out

Even though an automobile will only be driven off and on to a trailer during the shipping process, it is necessary to make sure that it is in operable condition beforehand.

auto shipping image #5While in-depth automotive knowledge is not necessary to check the battery, the tire pressure and fluid levels, your neighborhood service station or dealership can help out if needed. Alert the mover if you have been experiencing any particular problems, and make sure that they are aware of any leaks that could drip onto another vehicle. You should also disable the car’s alarm and make sure there is sufficient fuel in the tank. You want to keep the gas tank at around an eighth to a quarter full. There needs to be some, but more than that is just extra weight.

Finally, if you are unsure about anything throughout the process, feel free to ask your carrier questions.

Written by Ben Leffler of uship.com, an online marketplace for Vehicle Shipping.